French adjective exercise:
regular adjectives

On the previous page, we looked at the form of French adjectives. More specifically, we looked at the "regular" rules for making the masculine/feminine and singular/plural forms of French adjectives, to match the noun they correspond to. Now on this page, it's your turn to make some phrases with French adjectives. In each case, you'll have to come up with the French phrase to match the English phrase given. The English phrase will always consist of a, an or some plus an adjective plus a noun. So for each question, you'll need to:

  • decide what the word is for the noun (so if it's boy, you need the word garçon);
  • decide what the word is for the adjective (so if it's French, you need the word français);
  • choose the article— that is, the French word for a/an/someun for masculine, une for feminine, des for plural ("some");
  • remember the word order: the adjective goes after the noun in French (at least, it always will in this exercise!);
  • decide if you need to add an -e to the adjective (if the noun is feminine, and the adjective doesn't already end in -e);
  • then, decide if you need to add an -s to the adjective (if the noun is plural— i.e. you're saying "some ..."— and the adjective doesn't already end in -s).

If you get stuck, look carefully at the examples of French adjectives on the previous page. Note also:

  • click the vocabulary icon to see the list of vocabulary used in this exercise if you're not sure of the word for a particular noun or adjective (or you're not sure which one is used in this exercise).

Next: irregularities in adjectives

On the next page, we look at a slight irregularity in some French adjectives: namely that some ending in a -n double the -n in the feminine form.

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This page written by Neil Coffey. Copyright © Javamex UK 2014. All rights reserved.